S’no Joke!

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S’no Joke!

Here’s the latest from Green Grenouille  welcoming committee

Green Grenouille

The Green Grenouille welcoming committee are not impressed by the weather!

Grenouille No.1 – No! I can’t look at any more snow.

Grenouille No.2 – I refuse to listen to any more weather forecasts!

Grenouille No.3 – Oooops! Did I say that out loud?

Outside indeed it still looks like winter but in the cold frame most of the hardy greens are almost ready for harvesting, despite the fact the lid of the frame collapsed during one of the January storms and the little plants spent several weeks crushed and frozen under the tarp. Goes to show just how hardy tat soi, rapunzel, kale, mizuna and arugula really are! In a few weeks they won’t seem half so special but at the moment all these early greens taste A-maz-ing!

Early greens

Tat soi, kale, mizuna and arugula all growing quite happily in a makeshift cold frame

 

I’m always trying new ways to extend my harvest of greens and thought I’d share today’s little venture – planting in eaves trough. I salvaged a couple of pieces of eaves trough from a construction dump last year and cut into four foot lengths they gave me six troughs of a manageable size, approximately the same width as my raised beds. I’ve heard of growing lettuce etc. in eaves troughs but have always been a little skeptical, wondering how much watering is required (daily through the summer months I would imagine) and also how much nutrient needs to be pumped into the soil to sustain healthy growth.

items needed to make an eaves trough planter

Eaves trough cut into manageable (four foot) length, duct tape, old towel and some soil is all that’s needed to plant a row of kale

I’m more interested in starting seedlings in troughs indoors and then transferring them as ready made rows, that will slide smoothly out of the trough and directly into a waiting furrow in the garden. Firstly, I closed off the ends of the trough with duct tape. Coconut coir or cardboard would do just as well, I’m sure. I then cut strips of cloth (I sacrificed an old towel) that measured about a foot longer than the trough, leaving enough to allow for an overhang at each end when the strip of cloth is placed along the bottom of the trough. By doing this I hope to ease the transition from eaves trough to garden bed, causing as little disruption as possible to the roots of the plants by simply pulling on one of the end tabs of cloth and sliding the plug of soil directly into the waiting furrow. After I’ve cut away the duct taped end plugs, of course.

Seedlings ready to be transplanted

Kale seedlings ready to be transferred from a recycled commercial salad mix container into a length of eaves trough

I had seeds already started in the house that I’d seeded way too heavily. I should know better by now but I was not wholly trusting of the seed as it is several years old. I wasn’t sure how viable it would be but I think I got close too one hundred per cent germination. One more plus for kale – the seed is very robust and stores really well! I let the soil around the seedlings dry out, thinking that it would be easier to separate the delicate roots if the soil fell away easily. It did, but of course it could be argued that the tiny plants would already be stressed by this drying out and therefore the untangling of roots would be even more traumatic for them. I’ll just have to wait and see on that one.

I want to start peas in a couple of the troughs and I’m hoping this method will work well for that as well. Stay tuned!

Early spring greens growing in a tractor tire

A salvaged tractor tire set up as a hot box provided weeks of super early spring greens

And of course I’m definitely going to set up another ‘hot box’ in the old tractor tire I found washed up on the beach  a couple of winters ago. Not sure if I wrote about it last year or not, but here’s a quick recap for anyone who might have missed that post – First a layer of hot manure – I used chicken, well covered with a thick (3-4 inches) layer of organic mulch (straw, leaves, seaweed, etc.) This is to keep the roots of the plants from touching the manure, which is used specifically as a heat source and therefore needs to be ‘hot’ –  which also translates as – much too fresh to consider as a source of nutrients at this time.

Tire with some manure

Hot manure is placed in first then topped with protective mulch barrier before soil goes in

I packed the inner core of the tire with seaweed (eel grass to be specific) and then filled the central hole (where the wheel hub would go) with a rich mix of soil and organic nutrients and then I wrapped the tire in plastic sheeting until the seeds were well sprouted and the temperatures had risen. There was snow on the ground when I was doing this and I really didn’t know if I was pushing my luck just a bit but no – in the earliest days of spring I was able to pick salads from this tire, which kept producing phenomenal greens week after week after week.

Tire wrapped in plastic

The tire didn’t look like much at first!

I have had good success with hot box set ups in the cold frames but I think the black rubber of the tire helped intensify both the heating up of the soil and also aided in heat retention. On some really bitter days the temperature of the soil in the tire was usually fifteen to twenty degrees warmer than in the regular garden beds.

 

 

And finally, my new book has arrived! The Food Lover’s Garden is now in stores. The people at New Society Publishers have done a wonderful job and I am delighted with the look of this book. It’s in full color and is quite lavishly illustrated. Thirty of the images are taken from watercolor paintings I did of one of my fave. subjects – vegetables – and the forty some other images are all from pictures I took in one of my fave. places – my garden 🙂

So yes, this book feels quite close to my heart, especially as it’s all about the joys of growing, preparing and eating  good, healthy food. The official launch will be at the Halifax Main Branch Library, April 22nd. at 2.00

The really exciting thing is that all the original paintings, framed, are to be auctioned off on line during the month of May, with all proceeds going to support Soul’s Harbor Rescue Mission and Dartmouth North Community Food Center. Needless to say I’m thrilled to be able to use my art in true permaculture fashion, that is for more than one purpose – to illustrate the Food Lover’s Garden and also to support two organizations which I greatly admire!

Food Lover's Garden bcover

Front Cover of my new book – in stores now

 

 

 

 

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