It Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time!

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If I was to ever write my memoires, which I know I never will, the title would have to be: It Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time! My life path is littered with seemingly brilliant, ultimately disastrous ideas… some more disastrous than others! Fortunately I’ve learnt to pay attention to the warning signs; the clanging bells and flashing lights that I used to ignore when blundering on towards yet another pending catastrophe. But not always 😦

The ‘fedging’ or living fence project I was so excited to share a few months ago is one such of those I-should-have-seen-that-coming ideas. Perhaps by sharing my mistakes I can at least prevent others from following along the same, misdirected path. And before I start to sound too depressed about it, let me say that at least half of the fedges I planted are brilliant. I love them. And in fact one hundred per cent of the fedges are brilliant if we’re just basing their success on growth. This is the problem.

Fedge gateway

This fedge I was so pleased with has turned into a monster

One ‘fedge’ prospered even better than all the others – the one surrounding one of my vegetable plots. And why did it flourish so vigorously? Because it was gobbling all the nutrients that were intended for my crop, in this case potatoes. Potatoes! I mean really, of all the crops to under produce! They need so very little to be happy and usually produce twice our requirements. This year, other than some fingerlings and some blues, which I’m saving for special dinners, we’re already out of spuds.

With subtle slight of hand I’m blaming it on the fedge for stealing every bit of nutrient out of my wonderfully fertile garden plot, although in truth I’m fully responsible, because of course I should have known better. Fedges are wonderfully seductive, and I was lured into thinking solely on how great they’d look and how they’d be just perfect to keep marauding geese out of my garden. To add insult, the tender slips I stuck in the ground mere months ago have grown tenacious roots that have all snarled together forming an impenetrable web. It’s going to take a lot of digging to get them out.

 

Note to self, and to anyone else who’ll listen, only plant fedges along perimeters where you’re sure you’ll never, ever want anything else to flourish. I’m told they have a different but  equally devastating effect on wells, septic systems and foundations. Yikes!

Hands cutting a space into a bale of straw

It’s a lot harder than might be expected to cut holes in a bale of straw!

One thing I’ve been rather down on and I realize unfairly so, is straw bale gardening. I was needing to write a piece on my experience with straw bale beds recently and I realized that everything I had to say was positive. I guess all I’d remembered was how difficult it actually is to cut planting spaces out of a bale of straw. And certainly if other options exist, I’d chose them first. But  on a rock hard surface, in a narrow space, they will provide the opportunity to grow some food.

close up of straw-bale bed

The newly constructed straw bale with planting spaces filled with dirt was planted with sunflowers and cosmos

 

 

Cutting out spaces and filling them with fertile soil mix is essentially creating fully organic planters which will eventually decompose and become soil. That’s what finally happened to mine. After several years of being a straw-bale bed, the straw vanished almost overnight, or so it seemed, and I was left with some very friable, fertile soil.

show a mis of greens growing in dirt

The mix of mache, mizuma and tatsoi thrived well into December in what remains of the straw-bale bed

 

 

A fall crop of winter greens was more than happy to flourish in it and this after it had supported a season of spinach and arugula. Nothing to complain about there.

Seed catalogues are already out and well thumbed. We try to save as much seed as possible, here on QuackaDoodle, but it’s always fun to try at least a couple of new things each year. Definitely no more  Chinese winged beans; they were a once and never again, for us.

jars of salsa verde stacked on counter top

The tomatillos harvest made lots of salsa verde

Tomatillos on the other hand, a big Yes! They produced well and made great salsa verde (but of course they did, as that is what they’re most noted for) but also, they were equally good as a substitute for green tomatoes, in green tomato mincemeat.  One more plus is their appearance – they really are a funky little (and not so little) plant and I love the way each fruit comes individually wrapped in its own paper case.

close up of tomatillo plant

The bees go gaga for the little yellow flowers of the tomatillo plant.

I have sweet potato slips rooting and potted up. Definitely pushing the limits with these and any success will depend on what kind of summer we have this year. A cold wet one like last year will definitely not work for sweet potatoes… or for me either, come to that!

 

cover of Permaculture For The Rest of Us

Permaculture For The Rest of Us ~ Abundant Living on Less than One Acre

My BIG NEWS is that I have been invited to give three presentations at The Mother Earth News Fair in Belton Texas. This all came about because of my recent book, Permaculture For the Rest of Us.

It will be going there with my publisher, New Society Publishers. I’ll finally get to meet some of the people I’ve been working with for a couple of years, but have never actually met. Excited!

snow covered garden

Yesterday the garden looked like this

 

 

 

 

 

Yesterday I was surround with banks of snow but after a night and most of a day of heavy, heavy rain it’s mostly gone and I can see more green than white. Oh joy! My green thumb is starting to twitch already and as soon as I get back from Texas I plan to start seeding my herbs and seriously starting to plan what else needs to be started and when. Around these parts it’s important not to be tricked by a brief respite from winter (today is plus eight!) and start seeding too soon. But it’s never too early to start dreaming, right! 🙂

a long shot of a thriving garden with lots of green growth

today it looks like this… well, perhaps not quite like this 🙂

 

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One response »

  1. learning from your mistakes is a good or better than learning from your successes! Thanks so much for this posting Jenni. And all the best with your presentations in Texas – wow!

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